You're in all Blogs Section

Recent Tree Removal

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Verticillium Wilt


Verticillium wilt is one of the most common and destructive diseases of shade and ornamental trees in Indiana.  Redbud and hard maple trees are especially susceptible. In addition, Verticillium wilt attacks more than 80 other different tree species and many other plants, such as potato, tomato, rose, lilac, and snapdragon. In all, more than 300 plant species have been reported susceptible to this disease. Yews and conifers do not appear to be susceptible.

Symptoms

During midsummer, leaves turn yellow at the margins, then brown and dry. Sudden wilting of leaves on one or several branches may occur. Fre­quently, the foliage on only one side of a tree wilts. The wood under the bark of wilting branches is discolored in streaks. The discoloration will vary from bright olive-green (maples) to chocolate-brown (redbud), depend­ing upon the tree species and how long it has been infected. The discoloration might occur as distinct bands, streaks, or flecks in the sapwood. To examine for discol­ored sapwood, cut into the outer sapwood at the base of branches showing leaf wilt; also examine the outer rings of wood at the cut end of a pruned branch for signs of discol­oration.

Host susceptibility and environ­ mental conditions influence severity of symptom development. Trees under drought, nutrient, or salt stressare more extensively invaded by this pathogen. An infected tree may die in a single season or linger on for many seasons, with branch after branch dying and being invaded by decay or canker fungi.

Cause

The soil-borne fungus, Verti­cillium albo-atrum, causes Verti­cillium wilt. Infection occurs through the root system. The fungus is an excellent soil inhabit­ant, and produces resting struc­tures that can survive in soil for many years. The fungi that grow from these structures can directly penetrate roots of susceptible host plants. Growth within the host occurs within the water-conduct­ing tissues, resulting in blockage
of water movement from the roots to the foliage.

Click here for full article

Sourced from the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Tree Removal using a Crane

Check out how Family Tree Service got the job done removing a tree with a crane!

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Great Appreciation from a valued customer

It’s great to get positive feedback from all of our customers, but this one took a minute to thank us with a little poem.

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Why Hire an Arborist?

Why Hire an Arborist?

Learn about services that arborists provide, criteria for selecting an arborist, and the benefits of hiring an ISA Certified Arborist.

Arborists specialize in the care of individual trees. They are knowledgeable about the needs of trees and are trained and equipped to provide proper care.
Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns. Well cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. Poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability. Pruning or removing trees,
especially large trees, can be dangerous work. Tree work should be done only by those trained and equipped to work safely in trees.

Services That Arborists Can Provide

Pruning

An arborist can determine the type of pruning necessary to maintain or improve the health, appearance, and safety of trees. Pruning techniques include removing limbs that:

    • interfere with utilities or structures

    • obstruct streets or sidewalks

    • are dead, weak, or decayed and pose an unacceptable risk

    • are diseased or insect-infested

    • have been damaged by storms

    • will increase penetration and reduce wind resistance within canopy upon removal (thinning)

Other pruning techniques are used to maintain proper structure in young trees, improve tree shape or form, and reduce the likelihood of future damage during storm events.

Read Full Article Here

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Six Chores for Healthier Spring Trees

The tree-filled landscapes of winter can be mistakenly thought to be asleep. Wintering trees are not sleeping; they are simply still, counting the days until spring. Only then will it be apparent whether the tree has saved enough resources to respond to the new season of growth.

Winter is a difficult time for trees that must stand alone against all circumstances that the season can generate. Trees have some internal methods of protection. Most of the growing points in the tree are protected inside jackets called buds, and food reserves are carefully conserved for the coming needs of spring. Also, water continues to move through the tree until it freezes. However, these protective stages may breed other problems. For example, creatures needing a meal chew and nibble on the resting buds and twigs.

What can you do to help your valuable trees? A few things can help a tree be more efficient and effective in surviving the winter and thriving in spring. These small winter investments can pay off in a large way, yielding healthy and structurally sound trees.

The “Critical Six” things to do for your tree this winter are:

  1. Add a thin layer of composted organic mulch to blanket the soil surface. Mulch protects and conserves tree resources and recycles valuable materials.
  2. Properly wrap new trees that have not developed a corky bark and could easily be damaged. Mechanical injury from the environment, including chewing and rubbing by animals, must be prevented.
  3. Remove or correct clearly visible structural faults and deadwood. Try to make small pruning cuts that minimize the exposure of the central heartwood core on branches.
  4. Perform limited greenwood pruning of declining and poorly placed branches. Pruning should conserve as many living branches as possible, with only a few selective cuts.
  5. Fertilize with elements needed in small quantities. Essential elements added over a mulch layer will help provide a healthy soil environment for root growth.
  6. Water where soils and trees are cool but not frozen and where there has been little precipitation. Winter droughts need treatment with waters the same as summer droughts. However, it is easy to overwater in winter, so be careful.

 
Full Article Here

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Topless Trees Are Indecent

Trees must be pruned sometimes to avoid interference with utility lines, buildings, or parts of the surrounding environment. Whenever pruning to reduce a tree’s size is required, avoid the harmful practice of topping.

Topping involves removing all parts of a tree above a certain height with no consideration for its structure or health. This method is not a viable method of height reduction but only a temporary and ineffective solution that actually makes a tree more hazardous in the long run.

The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) explains why topping is not an acceptable pruning technique. “Topping is probably the most damaging and detrimental thing a person can do to a tree,” says Sharon Lilly, ISA Director of Educational Goods and Services. “Topped trees are ugly, and the harmful effects usually endure for the life of the tree.”

The destructive effects of topping include:

“Starved” trees – Topping often removes 50 to 100 percent of the leaf-bearing crown, robbing the tree of food-creating leaves.

Creation of weak shoots – As a defense mechanism, a tree will quickly grow food-producing shoots (up to 20 feet in one year) that are weak and prone to breaking, resulting in a more hazardous tree.

Added stress for the tree – If a tree does not have enough stored energy, it will not be able to produce the chemicals required to defend the multiple wounds from a disease or insect attack.

“Sunburned” trees – The leaves within a tree’s crown absorb sunlight. Without this protection, branches and trunks are exposed to high levels of light and heat, which can burn the tissues beneath the bark.

Poor aesthetics – Topping removes the ends of branches, often leaving unsightly stubs and destroying the natural form of the tree. A tree that has been topped can never fully regain its natural form.

Higher maintenance costs – Trees that have been topped will need pruning more often, or may die and need to be removed. Topped trees are potential liabilities and can reduce property value.

Read full Article Here

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

The Whillow Whisper – February

Six Winter Chores for Healthier Spring Trees

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — The tree-filled landscapes of winter can be mistakenly thought to be asleep. Wintering trees are not sleeping; they are simply still, counting the days until spring. Only then will it be apparent whether the tree has saved enough resources to respond to the new season of growth.

Winter is a difficult time for trees that must stand alone against all circumstances that the season can generate. Trees have some internal methods of protection. Most of the growing points in the tree are protected inside jackets called buds, and food reserves are carefully conserved for the coming needs of spring. Also, water continues to move through the tree until it freezes. However, these protective stages may breed other problems. For example, creatures needing a meal chew and nibble on the resting buds and twigs.

What can you do to help your valuable trees? A few things can help a tree be more efficient and effective in surviving the winter and thriving in spring. These small winter investments can pay off in a large way, yielding healthy and structurally sound trees.

The “Critical Six” things to do for your tree this winter are:

Add a thin layer of composted organic mulch to blanket the soil surface. Mulch protects and conserves tree resources and recycles valuable materials.
Properly wrap new trees that have not developed a corky bark and could easily be damaged. Mechanical injury from the environment, including chewing and rubbing by animals, must be prevented.
Remove or correct clearly visible structural faults and deadwood. Try to make small pruning cuts that minimize the exposure of the central heartwood core on branches.
Perform limited greenwood pruning of declining and poorly placed branches. Pruning should conserve as many living branches as possible, with only a few selective cuts.
Fertilize with elements needed in small quantities. Essential elements added over a mulch layer will help provide a healthy soil environment for root growth.
Water where soils and trees are cool but not frozen and where there has been little precipitation. Winter droughts need treatment with waters the same as summer droughts. However, it is easy to overwater in winter, so be careful.

FULL ARTICLE HERE

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Today’s Stump Removal

img_0148img_0149img_0150img_0152img_0153

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

The New familytreeserviceinc.com

We just relaunched our website with more content and a new look! Go check it out and tell us what you think. Spread the word to your friends by ‘liking’ our content. Thanks.

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized